Food intake for the body in emergencies is very different from the daily diet. Since we may be spending more energy than usual, we must eat foods high in energy and protein. “In a disaster or emergency we want a calorie food,” said Barry Swanson, a food scientist at Washington State University. “We need some nutrients and fiber-something to maintain a normal diet.” In an emergency, people tend to think generally of basic needs rather than emphasizing joy and taste, “said Elizabeth Andress, professor and food safety specialist at the University of Georgia. “But if we plan properly, we can have a good variety of foods and nutrients.” Because nobody knows when an emergency is coming, it might be in the unexpected moment and that’s why you should be able to prepare for your needs while an emergency, one of which is preparing the necessary equipment and items as you can in Prepper Readiness.

In an emergency, you have to have a supply of food, which has a long expiration date, so it can be stored for long periods of time. Make a list of everything that can be saved and check the expiration date every 6 to 12 months to keep it fresh. Good energy source. Peanut butter full of fat and healthy protein. No need to cool down after opening. Biscuits are a good substitute for bread and as a substitute when making sandwiches. Because of higher fat content, wheat or wheat biscuits have a shorter shelf life than similar foods (checkbox for expiration dates), but extra fibers will be fulfilled when very hungry. Consider vacuum packing biscuits to extend the freshness. Food supplies are high in energy. Very healthy and suitable for snacks. Look for containers or containers that are good or covered to prevent nuts from oxidation and loss of freshness. Choose multigrain cereal packaged one by one, so it does not become stale after opening. In the deficiency of fresh fruit, these healthful meals contribute potassium and dietary fiber. “Withered fruits produce large amounts of nutrients and calories,” says Swanson.Best Food for Emergency Supply

Food intake for the body in emergencies is very different from the daily diet. Since we may be spending more energy than usual, we must eat foods high in energy and protein. “In a disaster or emergency we want a calorie food,” said Barry Swanson, a food scientist at Washington State University. “We need some nutrients and fiber-something to maintain a normal diet.” In an emergency, people tend to think generally of basic needs rather than emphasizing joy and taste, “said Elizabeth Andress, professor and food safety specialist at the University of Georgia. “But if we plan properly, we can have a good variety of foods and nutrients.” Because nobody knows when an emergency is coming, it might be in the unexpected moment and that’s why you should be able to prepare for your needs while an emergency, one of which is preparing the necessary equipment and items as you can in Prepper Readiness.

In an emergency, you have to have a supply of food, which has a long expiration date, so it can be stored for long periods of time. Make a list of everything that can be saved and check the expiration date every 6 to 12 months to keep it fresh. Good energy source. Peanut butter full of fat and healthy protein. No need to cool down after opening. Biscuits are a good substitute for bread and as a substitute when making sandwiches. Because of higher fat content, wheat or wheat biscuits have a shorter shelf life than similar foods (checkbox for expiration dates), but extra fibers will be fulfilled when very hungry. Consider vacuum packing biscuits to extend the freshness. Food supplies are high in energy. Very healthy and suitable for snacks. Look for containers or containers that are good or covered to prevent nuts from oxidation and loss of freshness. Choose multigrain cereal packaged one by one, so it does not become stale after opening. In the deficiency of fresh fruit, these healthful meals contribute potassium and dietary fiber. “Withered fruits produce large amounts of nutrients and calories,” says Swanson.